Sustainable Employability or Entrepreneurship?

Updated: Nov 11

Globally speaking, 2020 came with mass layoffs and unemployment (so much for sustainable employability) and the trend has been shifting since then with many people making the decision to start their own businesses. But interestingly, there are around 530 million entrepreneurs in the world today, close to 100 million of whom are in Africa!




Happy Monday everybody! Over the weekend, I found myself reflecting on Gen A Consultancy’s vision: to transform localised thinking into globally connected opportunities that accelerate business growth.

Now, many would argue that to accelerate business growth, the entrepreneurial landscape needs to continually develop and grow. In other words, more individuals should seek innovative opportunities and act on them; in the process, becoming an agent of change who creates a new solution that contributes to the growth of the economy.

Yet, the opposite is true when considering the perspective of employers who are concerned with the notion of sustainable employability against a backdrop of the skills shortages being felt across industries around the world. Employers speak more about creating the right environment for employees to have a long, healthy, and happy career with them. The guiding principle is that by ensuring that a person loves their work and that they are motivated, they remain employable for eternity…or at least for as long as can be reasonably expected!

“The key difference here is perspective, so context is everything.”

In western society, there is a widely accepted view that employment opportunities are vast, and that one can be expected to have a long career, even in the same organisation if you so wish! As such, entrepreneurship is not the automatic choice post training and education because we have the option to go and work for someone else who will take on all the business risk while we receive a regular salary. Ofcourse, this can change at any point during the work lifecycle of an individual.


For many in the global south, which would be a dream come true…to finish school (or not) and still have the option to get government sponsored training, or attend college or university and pretty much be guaranteed a job at the end of it all? More than that, in the west there is airtight regulation in place that ensures that you are compensated reasonably well and because your employer wants to keep you for as long as possible, they throw in company benefits as part of your pay package! I am starting to get that feeling that I have taken so much in life for granted, aren’t you? In the meantime, the graduate in Africa knows they are just as skilled and educated as their counterparts across the seas, however, such guarantees of employment simply do not exist in their society, unless of course you are the son or daughter of someone influential.


Globally speaking, 2020 came with mass layoffs and unemployment (so much for sustainable employability) and the trend has been shifting since then with many people making the decision to start their own businesses. But interestingly, there are around 530 million entrepreneurs in the world today, close to 100 million of whom are in Africa!

Now, entrepreneurship in the African context is burgeoning because of a combination of factors:
  • Africa has the largest youth population of any continent in the world yet young people also make up 60% of Africa’s unemployed population;

  • Digital innovation is on the rise on the continent with an unprecedented number of tech hubs across the region, including co-working spaces, technology parks, incubators, accelerators and innovation hubs.

  • Governments are recognising that it is time to integrate those operating in the informal sector into the mainstream economy as it is key to those business’s survival.

One thing that is clear is that sustainable employability can lead to entrepreneurship by giving individuals who do not readily have access to capital and resources, an opportunity to earn that initial capital for their future endeavours. As such, Gen A is proud to be working closely with @localtolocalimpact, a Kenyan-based organisation connecting African freelancers to corporate clients worldwide. Our social media strategist, @KabiKimari has been doing an excellent job of highlighting all the good stuff that we are doing at Gen A Consultancy on our platforms. Moreso, they have polished up Gen A’s corporate image and their level of creativity has certainly highlighted the quality of talent that is in abundance on the continent of Africa!

At Gen A, we are keen to continue to develop the entrepreneurial landscape globally by connecting international businesses with African partners and vice versa. So, if you are an entrepreneur and you are ready for a new challenge, we are here to support you in your end-to-end expansion into Africa as a destination for growth.


Contact us at info@genaconsultancy.com

To your success!





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